8 Common Myths About Introverts

Here are 8 Myths About Introverts

“Why are you so quiet?”

Don’t you just get annoyed when asked this presumptuous question? Oftentimes when we’re just cozying up and minding our own business, some people may regard that as introverts being snobbish and uninterested in the other person or group of people. This is often so much further from the truth. 

Many myths unjustifiably paint introverts in a bad light. Here, we will list and hopefully expel some of these common myths.

1. Introverts hate people

Everyone knows that introverts aren’t the first people to seek out special attention or social engagements. Even though these events can exhaust an introvert, that does not mean they harbor a deep hatred for everyone and everything.

Instead of wild parties and jumping from one group to the next, introverts stick with a tight-knit friend group. Understandably, they prefer devoting their energy towards their inner circle and fostering these kinds of relationships. Although they are not social butterflies, introverts aren’t necessarily anti-social either when put on the spot. Their energy level really just boils down to their social tolerance.

2. Introverts are shy

“Gosh, I would never have known if you were an introvert until you told me!  You’re so talkative.”

Has anyone ever asked you that type of question? People tend to stereotype introverts as being shy or timid people who don’t speak up. This is not always the case since many socially adept introverts can easily strike up conversations with people. 

Just because someone is quiet, it doesn’t mean that they are shy by default. Sometimes, they just prefer to take on the observer role and let others lead the discussions. Introverts find it exhausting talking about things they aren’t fully interested in. So, in response, they tend to keep to themselves until the opportunity for them to share valuable insight arises.

3. Introverts are more prone to mental illness 

Not only does this generalization downplay and silence depressed extroverts, but this can also lead to damaging claims for introverts. Mental illness stems from a multitude of factors, and depression and anxiety can just as readily persist among extroverts.

“It’s damaging to convey that there may be a connection. When looking at what increases one’s risk of mental illness, we need to look at many factors: biology, childhood trauma, family history, and overall temperament,” Dr. Fraga from Healthline says.

4. Introverts are rude

There are many perfectly acceptable descriptors that people can use to describe an introvert - and rude isn’t one of them. Extroverts may assume that the silence of an introvert is a threat against them, which is a wildly false claim more often than not. The only thing that an introvert wants is to present their most genuine selves to the right people.

Social pleasantries may be a chore for introverts to deal with, so usually, they get exhausted or even frustrated when dealing with small talk. However, an introvert is more than capable of loosening up in interesting conversation, making them seem less rude to others in comparison.

5. Introverts don’t like going out in public

Now don’t get me wrong, introverts love the comfort of their own homes. It’s nice and quiet and perfect for re-energizing after a long day. But even introverts would find it taxing to be holed up in a room for hours on end. 

But unlike the rush of clubs and parties, introverts would rather go to places that have a more calm and mellow atmosphere. Places surrounded by nature and wildlife are perfect escapades for introverts. These could include parks, mountain trails, and beachside boardwalks. Aside from that, some introverts also love places that intellectually stimulate them, like museums or historical sites. Introverts can be just as outgoing as extroverts; the only difference is how quickly they lay in bed once nighttime comes around. 

6. Introverts are nerds and geeks

One of the most bewildering stereotypes of introverts is that we only obsess ourselves over impractical, cultural quirks. Think, video game lore or medieval warfare. And although many of us do possess knowledge on certain areas a bit more than the average person, we’re not all-knowing geeks. Nor are our knowledge limited to that single topic branch.

 Unlike extroverts who live predominantly through the outside world, introverts are more inward-driven and reflective. This is why many extroverts are more energized by doing things in the outside world (like clubbing in a rave) and introverts are more into things that bring them inner joy (like reading). Admittedly, however, your introversion does not shape your hobbies. It’s just a precursor for how much time you’d need to re-energize straight after.

7. Introverts can become extroverts

Has someone ever tell you they can help “fix” your introversion?

Some ignorant people go around and tell introverts that they can magically turn into an extrovert with practice. This is a bad assumption for several reasons.

  • You can’t just go around and change a person’s temperament
  • “Fixing” entails that something is broken. Introverts are not broken.
  • There’s unspoken discrimination against jobs best-suited for introverts.
  • Being an extrovert comes with its own slew of problems

With these four points, it should be clear that introverts don’t need to pretend to be someone they’re not to succeed in life. The extroverts who off-handedly tells an introvert to be more like them is more of a reflection of their unchecked ego more than anything else.

8. Introverts can’t become good public speakers

Many introverts are great in the spotlight. There are many celebrities, CEOs, and government officials who are introverts. Think of Bill Gates, for example, one of the richest men in the world — he’s an introvert. Research even shows that introverts are better at fostering conducive team environments, showing how receptive and harmonious introverts truly are.

Being an introvert doesn’t limit your ability to convey proper ideas. An introvert’s constant adherence to their thoughts prime them up to be thorough and clever team players. 

Closing thoughts

In a nutshell, introverts can thrive just as much as extroverts do when it comes to navigating real life. They just do it differently. That’s all for now!

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